Oxford welder with welding tips

Oxford Mig welders with welding tricks: MIG Welders are extremely popular because they tend to cost less than TIG or Stick welders with comparable power and features, are extremely easy to learn, and can tackle a wide variety of projects. Since the filler metal is fed through the MIG welding torch, welders can use both hands to hold the torch steady rather than using one hand to add filler metal, as in TIG welding. The wire feeder also makes MIG welding up to four times faster. The MIG welding process uses an inert gas to shield the weld and to keep it free from impurities. This makes MIG welding very neat and easy to clean up since there isn’t anything to chip away, which is typical for Stick welding. MIG welding can be used on a wide variety of materials such as aluminum and is also frequently used for automotive work. However, MIG also requires the purchase of shielding gas and generally requires materials that cost more when compared to other methods.

To us solid build & rugged reliability & long lifespan is just as important as welding performance! By designing our machines to be very electrically efficient we achieve performance levels much higher than other machines on the market, for example 400A + MIG welding on 230V single phase, Plasma cutting up to 36mm steel on 230V single phase, etc. Our OXFORD range now extends to around 50 different models & includes MIG, TIG, PLASMA, PULSE MIG & multi-process machines with ARC (MMA) MIG & TIG functions. Despite the ever increasing amount of low cost cheap imports available, our sales continue to grow year on year & we now have a good share of the UK market with additional export business. Discover more info on Oxford Welder.

For the best control of your weld bead, keep the wire directed at the leading edge of the weld pool. When welding out of position (vertical, horizontal or overhead welding), keep the weld pool small for best weld bead control, and use the smallest wire diameter size you can. A bead that is too tall and skinny indicates a lack of heat into the weld joint or too fast of travel speed. Conversely, if the bead is flat and wide, the weld parameters are too hot or you are welding too slowly. Ideally, the weld should have a slight crown that just touches the metal around it. Keep in mind that a push technique preheats the metal, which means this is best used with thinner metals like aluminum. On the other hand, if you pull solid wire, it flattens the weld out and puts a lot of heat into the metal. Finally, always store and handle your filler metals properly. Keep product in a dry, clean place – moisture can damage wire and lead to costly weld defects, such as hydrogen-induced cracking. Also, always use gloves when handling wires to prevent moisture or dirt from your hands settling on the surface. When not in use, protect spools of wire by covering them on the wire feeder, or better yet, remove the spool and place it in a clean plastic bag, closing it securely.

In many shops, the operator has to go to a tool room or supply area for a new contact tip, coil of wire or other welding accessory. This takes valuable time away from the welding cell and slows down overall productivity. To improve the operating efficiency and minimize wasted time, companies should stock at least a limited supply of all necessary items near the welding station – this includes shielding gas, flux and wire. Another helpful productivity enhancing tip is to switch to larger spools of wire such as from 25 lb. spools to 44 or 60 lb. spools to even larger packages of 1,000 lb. reels or 1,000 lb. drums. A simple switch like this means less changeover time, which adds up over the weeks, months and years. Shops should also be on the lookout for shielding gas waste. A simple device called a surge turbine can be placed at the end of the gun to provide a digital readout of the gas surge and flow rate. If the surge rate is high, investing in a surge guard can reduce the pressure, eliminating gas surges and waste. Leaks in the gas delivery system can also create a potential loss of money. By looking at the amount of consumables purchased each year and then examining the total gas purchased, a company can determine if there is a significant loss. Welding manufacturers and distributors should be able to provide average utilization figures so that loss can be detected. If there is a loss suspected, one of the easiest ways to check for leaks is to shut off the gas delivery system over the weekend. Check the level on Friday evening and then again on Monday morning to determine if gas was used while the system was in shut down mode. Find even more details at https://www.weldingsuppliesdirect.co.uk/.